Research update from the National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases

By Professor Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik, Professor Don Staines, Dr Helene Cabanas and the NCNED Team, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia Researchers from the National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases (NCNED) at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia, have published more than 70 papers on ME and chronic fatigue syndrome. The NCNED host and present at international conferences and Prof … Continue reading Research update from the National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases

Meet the Scientists: Prof Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik

Professor Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik standing outside a Griffith University building wearing a green top.

By Sasha Nimmo ‘Meet the Scientists’ is a series of interviews with researchers working on ME and chronic fatigue syndrome. We hear about current research directly from scientists and meet the people doing such important work to improve our health. The series will introduce early career researchers through to interviewing scientists and clinicians who have been working … Continue reading Meet the Scientists: Prof Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik

Impaired intracellular calcium transfer affecting Natural Killer cells in ME

Bar graphs representing TRPM3 current amplitude at + 100 mV after stimulation with 100 μΜ PregS in CFS/ME patients at just over 5. Healthy controls at around 12.5

by Sasha Nimmo Australian scientists at the National Centre for Neuroimmunlogy and Emerging Diseases at Griffith University published a new paper on reduced intracellular calcium mobilisation in Natural Killer (NK) immune cells and Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 3 (TRPM3) cation channels. Authors say it 'could suggest potential therapeutic targets and/or prognostic markers'. 'Loss of Transient Receptor … Continue reading Impaired intracellular calcium transfer affecting Natural Killer cells in ME

Study finds reduced ability to respond to energy demands in ME patients’ immune systems

figures C,D,E showing lower levels in glycolysis compared to controls

by Sasha Nimmo Scientists from Australia's Griffith University found 'a significant reduction of glycolytic reserve in resting natural killer (NK) cells' from people with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ICC ME) compared with healthy controls. "These findings suggest resting NK cells from ME/CFS patients have reduced ability to increase glycolytic flux to respond to high energetic demands for … Continue reading Study finds reduced ability to respond to energy demands in ME patients’ immune systems

Brain differences shown in chronic fatigue syndrome (Fukuda) study

diagram showing more of the brain lit up compared to controls

by Sasha Nimmo Scientists at Queensland's National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, Griffith University found obvious differences between the brains of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls, when examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during an attention test. The study examined 43 people with chronic fatigue syndrome (Fukuda criteria) and 26 healthy … Continue reading Brain differences shown in chronic fatigue syndrome (Fukuda) study

Tune into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome conferences

Invest in ME conference banner. Outline of London skyline. www.investinme.au #brmec8 #iime13

By Sasha Nimmo This year there are conferences on Myalgic Encephalomylitis and chronic fatigue syndrome being held in Australia, Canada, Sweden, the UK and the USA.  The USA's Open Medicine Foundation and the Canadian conferences will be live-streamed, in part or in full, while the Invest in ME conference will be available on DVD. Following … Continue reading Tune into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome conferences

Calcium channel ion defects: research from Australia’s Griffith Uni

Minister Enoch with NCNED researchers in lab looking happy

by Sasha Nimmo Queensland's Griffith University is home to the National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases (NCNED), one of the leading centres for research in ME and chronic fatigue syndrome.  They've been in the news lately for their patented biomarker discovery on calcium channel ion defects in patients. The words 'breakthrough' and 'finally' have … Continue reading Calcium channel ion defects: research from Australia’s Griffith Uni

Gene differences found in severe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis patients

Queensland scientists looked at patients with moderate and severe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (International Consensus Criteria). In the severe ME patients, they found 37 genes were significantly upregulated and 55 genes were significantly downregulated compared with nonfatigued controls. However, there was no difference in expression of protein kinase genes between moderate ME patients and controls.

Australia: 2 in 5 chronic fatigue syndrome diagnoses wrong, worse for ME

Griffith University building by night

by Sasha Nimmo Around 38% of Australians diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) do not meet the Fukuda chronic fatigue syndrome definition used by the US government. More than two-thirds don't meet the International Consensus Criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ICC ME). Australia has no national clinical guidelines but patient organisations endorse the ICC or … Continue reading Australia: 2 in 5 chronic fatigue syndrome diagnoses wrong, worse for ME